GQ Electronics Technical Support Forum
.


GQ Electronics Technical Support Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics | Members | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 GQ Electronics Forums
 3. GQ EMF EF Meter RF Spectrum Power Analyzer
 5G Images
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

JVonD

USA
1 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2020 :  08:54:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Can folks please post images of their EMF-3** picking up 5G cell radiation, mainly the high band. I'm curious what I need to look for.
Thanks! ~J (EMF-390/GMC-300E)
Reply #1

rfrazier

USA
44 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2020 :  13:12:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi JVonD,

Sorry. Nobody will be able to post images of this meter picking up 5G high band, because it cannot do so. 5G high band uses frequencies of 24 GHz or 28 GHz and up depending on who you ask. The EMF-3** meters only go up to 8 GHz or 10 GHz. They will not pick up 5G high band signals. As far as I know, there is no affordable consumer meter available that will, and even most professional meters don't. Having said that, 5G high band signals are fairly limited right now, and are usually short range high speed signals. You might find them on the main streets in the center of a city, for example. Much of 5G operates in low and mid band. These signals should be readable by the EMF-3** meters, just like regular 3G and 4G cellular signals, and will be visible on the RF explorer screen. Many of those signals are in the .6 GHz - 3.5 GHz range. Note that the spectrum analyzer screen does NOT respond between 1.04 GHz and 2.4 GHz Nor does it respond above 2.5 GHz. But, you should be able to get a signal level reading or a visual representation of any group of signals below 8 GHz or 10 GHz depending on the model of the meter. I'm sure the meter has a lower frequency limit too, but I don't know what that is. Most likely all cellular signals are above the meter's lower frequency limit. Point the meter at any active cell tower within 1/2 mile or so and you can see what those look like in RF browser mode. I don't think there would be any visual difference between 3G and 4G and 5G signals, but I don't know that for certain. There may be 3G, 4G, and 5G signals mixed in on the same tower. One thing that there probably will be related to 5G is MORE cell towers, including hidden micro cell towers, which may look like part of a building, a lamp post, or even a mailbox. And, those more cell towers will be emitting MORE signals. So, you need to be concerned about your overall level of exposure and the amount of time of your exposure. If you can easily see a cell tower, or if you're near one that's hidden, you're probably too close.

Here's a cool 5G article:

https://venturebeat.com/2019/12/10/the-definitive-guide-to-5g-low-mid-and-high-band-speeds/

See my other forum thread that I posted for lots more info on how to use the meter and how to take readings and what they mean.

https://www.gqelectronicsllc.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=8856

Ron

-----
Ron Frazier - In training with the Building Biology Institute (https://buildingbiologyinstitute.org/) to become an independent Electromagnetic Radiation Specialist (EMRS). We measure, document, analyze, and recommend mitigations for harmful EMF exposures.
All my statements are mine alone though.

Edited by - rfrazier on 02/13/2020 13:20:08
Go to Top of Page
Reply #2

GER_aki75

Germany
18 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2020 :  01:13:13  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
"... As far as I know, there is no affordable consumer meter available that will, and even most professional meters don't. ..."


There is a meter for 40Ghz. It costs about 950.
https://www.eudisa.com/de/produkte/elektromagnetische-sicherheit/eme-guard-xs-40ghz/


GMC 320 Plus V4
GMC 500 Plus
EMF 390

Geigermap Location: 48.348745928343035,10.899212072585215

Edited by - GER_aki75 on 07/02/2020 05:37:24
Go to Top of Page
Reply #3

mjh

USA
9 Posts

Posted - 07/02/2020 :  21:07:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
$64,000 question: I have the EMF-390. My assumption was that if there is a strong 5g signal in the area that this meter would max out at the highest range of the meter...10-Ghz level. (my meter would max out but I could be informed the the danger level). 5g ranges between 30Ghz and 300Ghz. So would I get a max reading on the meter, since it's way beyond the 10 Ghz max... or no reading at all because it is out of the frequency range/capabilities of this meter?

Please advice. Thanks!
Mike

Mike
Go to Top of Page
Reply #4

mjh

USA
9 Posts

Posted - 07/03/2020 :  07:16:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Okay, I would like to further clarify my question above. After doing some more research I discovered this point from ZLM "The 5G(5th generation) network uses two frequency bands: low-band (600MHz-6GHz) and high-band (24GHz to 86GHz millimeter wave band)" Although I heard several other quote the high 5G range at 30-300ghz.

So my refined question to you experts here: What kind of reading will the EMF-390 detect on the 5g high frequency band? ...so, (ASSUMING ALL OTHER THINGS BEING EQUAL AND ASSUMING AN RF SOURCE IS PRODUCING, 86GHz) will it give a very high max reading on the meter? Or, no reading at all since past the 10 GHz limit of this meter?

Thanks for any feedback and insight you can provide.

Mike

Mike
Go to Top of Page
Reply #5

rfrazier

USA
44 Posts

Posted - 07/05/2020 :  18:10:34  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by GER_aki75

quote:
"... As far as I know, there is no affordable consumer meter available that will, and even most professional meters don't. ..."


There is a meter for 40Ghz. It costs about 950.
https://www.eudisa.com/de/produkte/elektromagnetische-sicherheit/eme-guard-xs-40ghz/





Hello GER_aki75. Sorry, I cannot read German. But, that link is interesting. Technically, I wouldn't call that a meter. I'd call it a detector, since it neither shows a waveform like the GQ EMF-390 rf browser, nor does it display a numeric reading of the field strength. But, thanks for sharing. Very cool. Ron

-----
Ron Frazier - In training with the Building Biology Institute (https://buildingbiologyinstitute.org/) to become an independent Electromagnetic Radiation Specialist (EMRS). We measure, document, analyze, and recommend mitigations for harmful EMF exposures.
All my statements are mine alone though.
Go to Top of Page
Reply #6

rfrazier

USA
44 Posts

Posted - 07/05/2020 :  19:33:35  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjh

Okay, I would like to further clarify my question above. After doing some more research I discovered this point from ZLM "The 5G(5th generation) network uses two frequency bands: low-band (600MHz-6GHz) and high-band (24GHz to 86GHz millimeter wave band)" Although I heard several other quote the high 5G range at 30-300ghz.

So my refined question to you experts here: What kind of reading will the EMF-390 detect on the 5g high frequency band? ...so, (ASSUMING ALL OTHER THINGS BEING EQUAL AND ASSUMING AN RF SOURCE IS PRODUCING, 86GHz) will it give a very high max reading on the meter? Or, no reading at all since past the 10 GHz limit of this meter?

Thanks for any feedback and insight you can provide.

Mike



Hi Mike. I think I can shed some light on this. Let's try some metaphors. Human ears are a sound detector. Not technically a meter, since there's no display. But we can detect the intensity of a variety of sounds. More intense is loud, and less intense is soft. That's like the field strength of an RF signal. Now, our ears also detect a variety of frequencies. They have a frequency range, just like the RF meter ... but not the SAME range though.

Human ears typically detect about 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz (20 KHz) for a young person with good ears. 20 Hz is a low frequency, like a bass guitar or a large drum. 20 KHz is a high frequency, like the tinkling of chimes or a really high note on a flute. Signals in the ultrasonic range, above 20 KHz, are above the range of human hearing. Dogs can hear some ultrasonic sound, hence the existence of ultrasonic dog whistles. If you have a human and a dog nearby, and you blow an ultrasonic dog whistle, then the human will hear (detect) NOTHING. The dog will detect it and do whatever they do, approach, retreat, bark, howl, whatever. The dog's hearing has a greater high end range than humans' hearing.

Now, suppose you play a mid range tone, say 10 KHz, at the same time you play an ultrasonic tone, say 30 KHz. The human will ONLY hear the 10KHz tone. But the dog will hear both the 10 KHz tone and the 30 KHz tone, since his detectors have a greater range.

The radio meter is the same way. It has a range that it can "hear" or detect. It's not obvious what the low end of the frequency range is from the specs of the GQ EMF-390, but let's say it's 200 MHz (for the general receiver, not the spectrum analyzer)(This is a guess on my part). And, the upper end of the range is 10 GHz. So, within those ranges, the meter will give you a visual and numeric indication of the signal. But, outside those ranges, it will not. It will read very LITTLE, or NOTHING. This is true of all RF meters operating outside their range.

Note that many 5G systems are operating in low and mid band frequencies, below 10 GHz. In fact, it is much more desirable for them to stay below 1-2 GHz, since these signals go through objects and buildings much better. So, if you have a 5G source operating at low or mid band frequencies below 10 GHz (in the case of the GQ EMF-390), then the meter will detect, visualize, and numerically measure the signal. BUT, if you have a 5G source operating in the high band above 10 GHz, then the meter will show LITTLE or NONE of the signal. Even if you're in the midst of a 5G high band RF field that is hazardous to your health, the meter will show LITTLE or NOTHING. Now, if the 5G signal has components that are in the low and mid bands below 10 GHz (for this meter), and components that are above 10 GHz, then the meter will detect, visualize, and numerically measure ONLY those components that are below 10 GHz. This is just like playing a 10 KHz musical tone and a 30 KHz musical tone near a human. The human will only hear the 10 KHz tone. The meter only "hears" the RF tones below 10 GHz. Please see my forum topic, How to Sweet Talk You GQ EMF-390 for information about why it's really difficult to accurately measure modern RF signals. https://www.gqelectronicsllc.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=8856 Hope this helps. Would you like a bitcoin address so I can get my $ 64,000? Wink. Wink. Ron

-----
Ron Frazier - In training with the Building Biology Institute (https://buildingbiologyinstitute.org/) to become an independent Electromagnetic Radiation Specialist (EMRS). We measure, document, analyze, and recommend mitigations for harmful EMF exposures.
All my statements are mine alone though.

Edited by - rfrazier on 07/06/2020 08:45:52
Go to Top of Page
Reply #7

mjh

USA
9 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2020 :  08:32:00  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
rfrazier, Thank you! That was a very good description and clearly explains the idea how the meters detect the frequency range.

Mike
Go to Top of Page
Reply #8

rfrazier

USA
44 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2020 :  08:40:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjh

rfrazier, Thank you! That was a very good description and clearly explains the idea how the meters detect the frequency range.




Glad to help. Ron

-----
Ron Frazier - In training with the Building Biology Institute (https://buildingbiologyinstitute.org/) to become an independent Electromagnetic Radiation Specialist (EMRS). We measure, document, analyze, and recommend mitigations for harmful EMF exposures.
All my statements are mine alone though.
Go to Top of Page
Reply #9

EmfDev

1438 Posts

Posted - 07/06/2020 :  09:34:21  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thank you rfrazier for your really great explanation!
Go to Top of Page
Reply #10

marigueng5

Germany
1 Posts

Posted - 09/04/2021 :  03:26:53  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A further idea: I think a 5G capable handy could serve as detector also, and even give the strength of the signal. Don't know if 5G frequencies will appear subdivided as on WLAN WIFI with separately switchable 2,4 and 5 GHz, as I did not own one. But could be cheaper than 950 USD ?
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
GQ Electronics Technical Support Forum © Copyright since 2011 Go To Top Of Page
Generated in 0.25 sec. Snitz's Forums 2000